HORROR NOIRE GUIDE: 13 Essential Black Horror Films

Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror (2019) is an exceptional Shudder original documentary (based on the 2011 book of the same name by Robin R. Means Coleman) that traces the history of Black representation in horror films — and their love for, and experiences in, the genre.

Continue reading “HORROR NOIRE GUIDE: 13 Essential Black Horror Films”

[Podcast] Nocturnal Emissions #13: US, Greta, Horror Noire, and Ghost Watch!

I have another episode of my podcast out, episode 13, lucky number! In this episode I talk about the movies I’ve seen recently, and what my thoughts were. It’s not spoiler-y, but it does help if you’ve seen these movies before.

If you are interested in watching Horror Noire and Ghost Watch you can get 30 days FREE with Shudder if you use my code: NOCTURNAL. Tell em Isabella sent you!
https://anchor.fm/nocturnalemissionspodcast/embed/episodes/Episode-13-US–Greta–Horror-Noire–and-Ghost-Watch-e3kk1i

Women in Horror: Tales from the Crypt – Demon Knight

Demon Knight (1995) directed by Ernest Dickerson (The Walking Dead) is an action-packed slasher full of guts, gore, and evil demons. The film stars William Sadler as hero, Brayker, Billy Zane as The Collector, and Jada Pinkett Smith as badass Jeryline. The fate of humanity rests in the hands of unlikely duo, Brayker and Jeryline. They fight off demonic douchebag, The Collector, who unleashes an army of demons. Brayker has an all-powerful key to protect humanity. But can Brayker and Jeryline stop The Collector in time to save the universe?

Continue reading “Women in Horror: Tales from the Crypt – Demon Knight”

‘Horror Noire’ Review: A Captivating Deep Dive into the History of Black Cinema and the Horror Genre

There’s a school of thought (or, non-thought, as it were) that says you should just turn your brain off and enjoy movies. If it’s not “high-brow” entertainment, then it’s not worthy of exploration. Certainly, horror films, with their low production values and cheap thrills meant for teenagers aren’t worthy of serious study. But as seen in Xavier Burgin’s excellent documentary Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror, analyzing the horror genre is perhaps most worthy of study because of how it shows us how black people are depicted in American popular cinema. Although the documentary is primarily just movie clips and interviews with black scholars, filmmakers, and actors, Burgin weaves it all together into an engrossing story of American cinema. Horror Noire never professes to be a complete history of black cinema, but it does show how certain tropes appear in horror films with regards to black characters. By analyzing these tropes, Burgin, along with writers Ashlee Blackwell and Danielle Burrows, emphasizes not only a lesson in black representation, but the importance of analysis in making sure that representation is accurate and equitable.

Continue reading “‘Horror Noire’ Review: A Captivating Deep Dive into the History of Black Cinema and the Horror Genre”

Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror Premiers Tonight!

I can remember the first time I picked up Horror Noire. It was the spring of 2013, and I was close to graduating in Pittsburgh, PA. My favorite place in the whole city was a particular nook in the Carnegie Libary of Pittsburgh, that houses the books on cinema and overlooks the dinosaur fossil exhibit of the Natural History Museum. I would get a stack of books and just hide there, nap there and eat Quiznos sandwhiches there, it was my favorite place in the world. I was getting more into horror movies and came across the one book I could find on black culture and horror films. Robin R. Means-Coleman’s Horror Noire. It was eye-opening for me. It showed me that despite what my professors told me, there was a place in film for me. I felt seen, or maybe I felt like I could finally see, other films, other filmmakers, writers and creators. I held the book much longer that I should have, and I think I might still have an overdue fine with the CLP.

Coming out this month, the Netflix of horror, Shudder is premiering their first original documentary based on Robin R Means-Coleman’s book, along with several live screenings and panels. This is an ambitious venture for Shudder, bringing together the underappeciated but close-knit community of actors, writers, filmmakers and creators for a documentary like this. I only started to see black people on horror panels after Get Out, then (most of them my own) a number of horror panels had POC talking about POC issues, and POC issues only. It was nice to be included but it was also limiting, many of us want to talk about more things than how good Get Out was and how there needs to be more representation in horror. Hopefully this doc will be the official word on the topic, for many people to use as a reference for how they want to discuss the topic going forward.

I can’t wait to watch it and hopefully I can have a premeir party of my own in Seattle soon!

Continue reading “Horror Noire: A History of Black Horror Premiers Tonight!”

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑